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Night Music by Jenn Marie Thorne — book review

30189974.jpgA delightful and thoughtful summer romance meets the classical music world in Jenn Marie Thorne’s criminally underrated Night Music.
Ruby, the seventeen-year-old daughter of the renowned composer Martin Chertok, has always felt the pressure of her name. However, unlike her older siblings, who have all embarked on successful musical careers, Ruby messes up her audition for Amberley School of Music. Having dedicated the last ten years of her life to her piano, Ruby struggles to envision a future outside of the music world. Her mother, a famous piano player, is far more concerned with her tours than Ruby. Her father, who is on Amberley’s faculty, is also far too devoted to his work. Ruby decides to figure out who she is and what she wants to do over the course of the summer…and then she walks in on her father’s new protégé playing her piano. After a viral YouTube video Oscar gained the attention of Martin and Amberley.
While Ruby certainly feels somewhat envious of Oscar’s musical genius, she soon developed feelings for him, and their bond is solidified by their love for music.
Oscar, who is black, knows all too well that his relationship with Ruby might jeopardise this one in a lifetime opportunity. Regardless, the two find themselves falling for each other.
Their relationship struck me as refreshingly ‘grown-up’. There is no ‘will they, won’t they’. Ruby is immediately drawn to Oscar, and their close-living quarters allows them to spend a lot of time together.
In many ways Night Music is a coming of age. Both Ruby and Oscar struggles against social and familial pressures: Ruby’s name may be ‘prestigious’ but it is very much a burden, while Oscar has to reconcile his love for classical music with its institutional racial bias.
I simply love the realistic way in which Thorne interrogates themes of privilege and failure. Being branded a genius or a prodigy is not all its cracked up to be.

One of my favourite shows is Mozart in the Jungle and Night Music provides us with a similar take on the classical music world. Thorne’s setting (New York) too is also wonderfully rendered.
The romance between Ruby and Oscar is incredibly sweet. Ruby’s relationship with her parents was complicated and believable. More than anything I appreciated Ruby’s self-growth, her self-awareness, and her willingness to recognise and call her self out for her own privileged background or for the presumptions she makes about others.
I’ve read this twice and I look forward to reading it a third time.

My rating: ★★★★✰ 4.25 stars

Read more reviews on my blog / / / View all my reviews on Goodreads

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