Later by Stephen King

Did I finish this in a day? I sure did.

Stephen King simply excels at writing ‘kids with powers’. This is the 14th novel I’ve read by him and it deepened my already deep appreciation of him. The prose, characters, themes, and atmosphere in Later are pure King. Yet, while he has written more than book starring a child who Sees Dead People, Later gives a new slant to this classic trope. Set in New York between the late 2000s and early 2010s Later centres on and is narrated by Jamie. Now in his twenties, Jamie looks back to his childhood and early teens.
Raised by his single mother, a literary agent, from a very young age Jamie could see ghosts. His attempts at normality are thwarted by his ‘talent’. Jamie’s mother financial troubles and her rocky relationship with a NYPD detective cause a further strain on his childhood. His mother’s girlfriend eventually forces him to help in an active case.
While King’s children do occasionally come across as children of the 70s, more than the noughties, he manages to capture a child’s naïveté and perspective. Later is a suspenseful read that showcases King at his best. King explores the loss of innocence, questions of morality (“For the Greater Good”), police corruption, mortality, and, of course, evil. King’s prose is gripping, his characters—regardless of how we feel about them—engaging, his dialogues are absorbing, and his observations—about people, American society, death, love, the ways of the world—not only ring true to life but are also exceedingly insightful. I loved the novel’s metafictional moments, his references to the conventions of horror/Sees Dead People genre, his lampoon of a certain type of male author, and his self-references.

Stephen King simply excels at writing ‘kids with powers’. This is the 14th novel I’ve read by him and it deepened my already deep appreciation of him. The prose, characters, themes, and atmosphere in Later are pure King. Yet, while he has written more than book starring a child who Sees Dead People, Later gives a new slant to this classic trope. Set in New York between the late 2000s and early 2010s Later centres on and is narrated by Jamie. Now in his twenties, Jamie looks back to his childhood and early teens.
Raised by his single mother, a literary agent, from a very young age Jamie could see ghosts. His attempts at normality are thwarted by his ‘talent’. Jamie’s mother financial troubles and her rocky relationship with a NYPD detective cause a further strain on his childhood. His mother’s girlfriend eventually forces him to help in an active case.
While King’s children do occasionally come across as children of the 70s, more than the noughties, he manages to capture a child’s naïveté and perspective. Later is a suspenseful read that showcases King at his best. King explores the loss of innocence, questions of morality (“For the Greater Good”), police corruption, mortality, and, of course, evil. King’s prose is gripping, his characters—regardless of how we feel about them—engaging, his dialogues are absorbing, and his observations—about people, American society, death, love, the ways of the world—not only ring true to life but are also exceedingly insightful. I loved the novel’s metafictional moments, his references to the conventions of horror/Sees Dead People genre, his lampoon of a certain type of male author, and his self-references.
Later is an addictive read that offers readers a fantastic blend of genres—horror, coming of age, supernatural, crime—and will definitely appeal to fans of King.

my rating: ★★★★☆

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