Ghost Forest by Pik-Shuen Fung

“Lik bat chung sam—do you know what it means? It means, what your heart wants but cannot do. It is an uncomfortable feeling. It’s the feeling of wanting to do something and not being able to.”

Ghost Forest is yet another novel that I decided to read because of coverlove. While by no means a bad read I found myself bored, underwhelmed, and even slightly vexed by this novel’s contents. As unnamed narrators have become de rigueur in contemporary literature, in Ghost Forest we never learn the name of our narrator and protagonist. The novel is divided into extremely short ‘sections/chapters’, often lasting one page or two, that expand on a particular moment or conversation our mc has had. She’s a young(ish) Chinese Canadian woman who, in reaction to her father’s illness, recounts a few episodes from her childhood and teenage years. Growing up in Canada she saw her father (who worked and lived in Hong Kong) only once or twice a year. Her ‘western’ upbringing creates a chasm between her and her father, and both parties seem to feel frustrated by their inability to communicate.

My biggest issue with this novel was the way the narrative is presented. These ‘chapters’, which often amounted to very short paragraphs, did not suffice in giving us a clear glimpse into the narrator’s life, or her past, or any of the relationships she has. The narrative mentions that she has a sister but she plays no role within her story, which seemed weird to me since they supposedly grew up together (unless i missed something?). Her mother and grandmother seemed like far more interesting people but she only dedicated only a few ‘chapters’ to them (which only scratched the surface of who they were or what they lived through). The narrative was very much all flash, no substance. The author tries to use a certain type of ‘sharp’ language and or throws at us some ‘striking’ imagery but all the while I was aware of how contrived and clichéd it all was. These chapters are far too vague and ephemeral to be effective snapshots into this woman’s life.
I also disliked the self-pitying way in which she presents certain memories of her father, memories that are clearly meant to make her ‘sympathetic’ and him ‘cold’ but I, for one, did not care for it. The narrative doesn’t clearly convey the (supposed) grief this narrator feels nor is its depictions of illness and death as haunting as say the ones in Crying in H Mart .

Pretty cover aside, Ghost Forest struck me as a fairly insubstantial piece of writing. Apart from one or two chapters here and there I just did not ‘vibe’ with this novel. The language struck me as affected, the story, if we can call it such, emotionally manipulative, and the characters…blurry presences that barely registered. That’s all I have to say about Ghost Forest. If you are interested in reading it I recommend you check out some more positive reviews.

my rating: ★★½

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One Comment

  1. Fatma

    completely agree with your review!! i tried to read this and immediately knew that i wouldnt get along with it…the flash fiction-esque style of the chapters made it all feel so choppy

    Like

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